WHAT’S WRONG WITH ME?

Have you ever asked yourself the question, “What’s wrong with me?” I know that I have many times, and God is now challenging me to not do that anymore. God has shown me that this is the wrong question to ask on so many levels.

WHY ASKING “WHAT’S WRONG WITH ME?” NEEDS TO STOP
There are several reasons why we need to stop asking “What is wrong with me?”

  1. The question “What’s wrong with me?” reeks of judgment and condemnation. Romans 8:1 (KJV) says, “There is therefore now no condemnation to them which are in Christ Jesus.”
  2. God wants us to focus on the good in ourselves. Didn’t Paul relay In Philippians 4:8 (KJV), “Whatsoever things are true, whatsoever things are honest, whatsoever things are just, whatsoever things are pure, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things are of good report; if there be any virtue, and if there be any praise, think on these things”? 
  3. God says in Jerimiah 17:10 (NIV), “I the Lord search the heart, I examine the mind.” God is the examiner. Nowhere in the Bible does it tell us to examine ourselves for the purpose of diagnosing ourselves so we can make changes because the scriptures tell us clearly that’s God’s job. The Holy Spirit is the Agent of Change.
  4. Psalm 19:12 (NIV) says, “Who can discern his own errors? Cleanse me from my hidden faults.” David knew it was pointless to ask himself “What’s wrong with me?” because we as human beings don’t have the capability to find errors in ourselves. That information has to be revealed by the conviction of the Holy Spirit.
  5. We are probably asking the question and looking for the answer so that we can fix ourselves and appropriate our own righteousness.

ASKING “WHAT’S WRONG WITH ME?” IS COUNTERPRODUCTIVE
Honestly, that question is injected into our minds by the devil and is fueled by the lie he tells us, “If I don’t focus on what’s wrong with me, I’ll never change.” The truth is, the more I focus on what is wrong with me, the less progress I will make. That seems counterintuitive, but it’s true. Why? I Peter 5:5 says, “God resists the proud, but gives grace to the humble.” So asking “What’s wrong with me?” and trying to change ourselves creates conditions that will impede the anointing of the Holy Spirit.

A BETTER OPTION: PRAYER
Let’s get real. When we stop asking “What’s wrong with me?” that’s a clear indication to God that we have stopped trying to do His job. The better option is to pray and tell God the following:
Lord, I give up. I don’t know what is wrong with me but you do.
I give up trying to diagnose and change myself.
I am asking you to give me revelation and change me by the power of your Holy Spirit.
Please tell me what you want me to do and I’ll do it.
“Search me, O God, and know my heart; Try me, and know my anxieties; And see if there is any wicked way in me, And lead me in the way everlasting” (Psalm 139:23-24).
I trust you to make the necessary changes in me. In Jesus’ name, amen.

LET’S FOCUS ON JESUS
God won’t work on a problem in us while we are trying to fix ourselves. Therefore, we need to let God diagnose and fix the problems while we focus our attention on Jesus. When we stop asking, “What’s wrong with me?” only then will we be able to see the changes in ourselves we so desperately want.

What are your thoughts about asking “What’s wrong with me?” Please leave a comment below.

Tracey L. Moore (a.k.a. The Purposeful Poet) is a poet, author and speaker whose goal is to challenge you to be your best for Christ. She holds a Master of Arts degree in Christian Counseling from Oral Roberts University and is an Associate Minister at Chesapeake Christian Center in Chesapeake, Virginia. Learn more about Tracey at http://www.TraceyLMoore.com.

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